IT Accessibility Center

Ergonomic Products Guide

Click on the workstation items below to see a set of guidelines to consider when purchasing that type of ergonomic equipment. If you are looking for a specific item and do not see it on this list, please contact the IT Accessibility Center at 573.884.2828.

Footstools
  • Footstools are available in different heights.
  • Footstools should be sturdy and wide enough for length of foot.
Document Holders
  • Document holders are available in different sizes, magnification capability and in-line adjustment.
  • Positioning options include: centered between the keyboard and the monitor, attached to the side of the monitor, or stand-alone on the desktop.
  • Stand-alones should be sturdy and able to easily stand on the desk.
Telephones
  • Use a wireless, hands-free headset for typing and talking at the same time.
  • Telephone should include a speakerphone as well as adjustable volume features.
  • Use a phone head/shoulder rest for neck support.
Monitors
  • Monitors should have adjustable height and tilt.
  • Low vision may require a larger monitor to view text at a larger size font.
Keyboards
  • Keyboards are available in many shapes and sizes.
  • Consider functions of the keyboard, such as the keypad (if you use one).
  • Curved keyboards assist with a more natural hand position.
  • Split keyboards can help with broader shoulders, injury, or frequent pain.
  • Mini or smaller keyboards are good for minimal space on keyboard trays or desks.
  • Wireless keyboards can be mobile and do not tether to the desk.
  • Built-in wrist rests provide support from sharp desk edges and give comfort when not typing.
Keyboard Trays
  • Keyboard trays should have adjustable features.
  • Keyboard trays should click into the desired position for stability.
  • Keyboard trays should click into the desired position for stability.
  • Look for sturdiness of the tray; thin plastic may tend to bounce while typing.
  • Make sure the tray is long enough for the keyboard and there is room to mouse.
  • Make sure the tray is wide enough to fit larger size keyboards.
  • One-piece trays offer a closer distance between keyboard and mouse and can also be used as desktops for writing.
  • Consider how the keyboard tray is installed; tools-free ones tend to loosen over time.
Wrist Rests
  • Wrist rests provide support from sharp desk edges and give comfort when not typing.
  • Wrist rests are available in different types of material.
Mouse
  • Mice are available in many shapes and sizes.
  • Consider functions of the mouse, such as a scroll button.
  • Upright and tilted mice provide a more natural hand position.
  • Roller mice can help with shoulder pain or help petite individuals who need the mouse closer to the keyboard.
  • Trackballs are stationary and discourage shoulder movement.
  • Wireless keyboards can be mobile and do not tether to the desk.
Chair
  • Type of chair should be determined based upon the type of work performed
  • Chair should be adjustable in several areas (especially height, seat pan, and lumbar).
  • Chair should be sturdy and able to roll in every direction.
  • A five-point base provides sturdiness.
  • Seat and back material should be breathable to maintain a good temperature throughout the day.
  • Seat pan length depends on the length of the user’s legs.
  • Determine seat pan length by placing three fingers between the front of the seat pan and the back of the knee.
  • The front of the seat pan should be rounded for comfort.
  • There should be enough hip room for comfort.
  • Make sure the lumbar is firm and provides support where it is needed.
  • Height is able to be adjusted to the height of the workstation.
  • Taller individuals may prefer higher backed chairs for more neck and shoulder support.
  • Headrests are available as added accessories to a chair.
  • Armrests should be padded for comfort.
  • Armrests should be adjustable in height and not collide with desk or work area.
  • The tilt feature is beneficial for relaxation.
Desks
  • The desk should easily fit a monitor, keyboard, and mouse.
  • The desk should accommodate the height of the person when sitting in the chair.
  • The work surface should be deep enough to hold a monitor at least an arm’s length away from the user.
  • Do not use glass top work surfaces.
  • The desk should have removable desk drawers.
  • The keyboard should be approximately 1-2 inches above thigh area.
  • Use desk space to store frequently used items or documents.
  • There should be no sharp edges around the edge of or underneath the desk.
  • There should be enough space underneath the desk for comfortable legroom.
  • The chair space underneath should be wide enough to accommodate the elbow rests.

ADA Accessible Desk Guidelines: http://www.computercomforts.com/wheelchair-solutions.html:

  • 32″W minimum for leg space
  • 22″D minimum for leg space
  • 27″H clearance for under table knee space*
  • 60″ diameter required for turning/maneuvering
  • 36″W minimum for aisle space

5% of tables in each classroom (minimum of one table per room) should meet these wheelchair guidelines.

Since the size of people and wheelchairs vary, the guideline recommends the tabletop height should adjust from 28″H-34″H.